I haven't even read all this stuff, much less understand it, but they seem like things in my future.

Dispose, Finalization, and Resource Management is an in-depth treatise on the nitty-gritty details about the end of life for .NET objects. Modern languages seem to prefer not promising much when it comes to destroying objects, and .NET is no different. Some day, this is going to save my ass.

Modern Language Features of Visual C++ 2005 is a detailed overview of the .NET features being added to C++. It seems a bit overwhelming trying to merge the complexity of C++ with the deep new features of .NET, but Microsoft has never been shy about loading on developer features. I think their strategy is to guarantee developers have enough Microsoft choices in front of them that they feel like they're choosing among technologies without ever considering a non-Microsoft offering.

tagged: ,   /   via: Ed at Work» 2 reactions

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[gravatar]
andrew 10:56 PM on 16 May 2005

One thing that they have yanked from VC2005 is support for __asm code. Thank God. That will discourage those dinosaurs (are you reading this, Dennis?) from doing a little inline stack manipulation for fun.

[gravatar]
mark 6:41 AM on 17 May 2005

reading the stuff about c++ it would seem c++ is the new asm. I presume there are massive advantages in using c++ in .Net that makes the amount of work (compared to even Java or C#) required worth while as well as seemingly needing to know where things are created in terms of heap/stack etc. I can understand using it for systems programming and interfacing with hardware etc. but I *thought* .Net was mainly aimed at the enterprise?

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